Tag Archives: Phishing

eBay Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

ebay-logo

eBay Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

(1) WebSite:
ebay.com



“eBay Inc. (stylized as ebay, formerly eBay) is an American multinational corporation and e-commerce company, providing consumer to consumer & business to consumer sales services via Internet. It is headquartered in San Jose, California. eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar in 1995, and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, it is a multi-billion dollar business with operations localized in over thirty countries.

 

The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a broad variety of goods and services worldwide. In addition to its auction-style sales, the website has since expanded to include “Buy It Now” shopping; shopping by UPC, ISBN, or other kind of SKU (via Half.com); online classified advertisements (via Kijiji or eBay Classifieds); online event ticket trading (via StubHub); online money transfers (via PayPal) and other services.” (Wikipedia)

 



(2) Vulnerability Description:

eBay web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “ebay.com/rover” page with “&mpre” parameter, i.e.

http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-67261-24966-0/2?mtid=691&kwid=1&crlp=1_263602&itemid=370825182102&mpre=http://www.google.com

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (26.0) in Ubuntu (12.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.


 

 

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from eBay to another site, eBay will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in eBay’s whitelist, e.g.
google.com

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from eBay to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from eBay directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
http://googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad system)

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

Poc Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4H-u17Y9ks

 

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/ebay-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



 

 



(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

Alvorlig feil i utbredt innloggingssystem

Alvorlig feil i utbredt innloggingssystem

Benyttes av Facebook, Google, Yahoo, LinkedIn, Microsoft og mange flere.

Wang Jing, en doktorgradstudent ved Nanyang Technological University i Singapore, har oppdaget en alvorlig sårbarhet knyttet til autentiseringssystemene OAuth 2.0 og OpenID. Sårbarheten, som er av typen «covert redirect», dreier seg om at en applikasjon tar en parameter og omdirigerer en bruker til parameteren uten tilstrekkelig validering. Ifølge Jing skyldes dette ofte at nettsteder har for stor tillit til sine partnere.

infosec

– Nettstedet sjekker domenenavnet mot et «token» (tildelt til partneren som et middel for verifisering) i den omdirigerte URL-en. Dersom paret er i godkjent-listen i nettstedets database, vil det tillate omdirigeringen. Men dersom URL-en tilhører et domene som har en «open redirect»-sårbarhet, kan brukerne omdirigeres fra nettstedet til et sårbart nettsted og deretter til en ondsinnet nettsted, skriver Jing.

http://webtech.lofter.com/post/1cd3e0d3_43c6ef5

Falha de segurança afeta logins de Facebook, Google e Microsoft

internet connection concept, 3d generated image

Um estudante de PHD de Singapura, Wang Jing, identificou a falha, chamada de “Covert Redirect”, que consegue usar domínios reais de sites para verificação de páginas de login falsas, enganando os internautas.

 

Os cibercriminosos podem criar links maliciosos para abrir janelas pop-up do Facebook pedindo que o tal aplicativo seja autorizado. Caso seja realizada esta sincronização, os dados pessoais dos usuários serão passados para os hackers.

 

Wang afirma que já entrou em contato com o Facebook, porém recebeu uma resposta de que “entende os riscos de estar associado ao OAuth 2.0″ e que corrigir a falha “é algo que não pode ser feito por enquanto”.

 

O Google afirmou que o problema está sendo rastreado, o LinkedIn publicou nota em que garante que já tomou medidas para evitar que a falha seja explorada, e a Microsoft negou que houvesse vulnerabilidade em suas páginas, apenas nas de terceiros.

 

A recomendação do descobridor da falha para os internautas é que evitem fazer o login com dados de confirmação de Facebook, Google ou qualquer outro serviço sem terem total certeza de que estão em um ambiente seguro.

 

 

Especialistas: erro é difícil de corrigir

O site CNET ouviu dois especialistas em segurança virtual sobre o assunto. Segundo Jeremiah Grossman, fundador e CEO interino da WhiteHat Security, afirma que a falha “não é fácil de corrigir”. Segundo Chris Wysopal, diretor da Veracode, a falha pode enganar muita gente.

 

“A confiança que os usuários dão ao Facebook e outros serviços que usam OAuth pode tornar mais fácil para os hackers enganarem as pessoas para que elas acabem dando suas informações pessoais a ele”, afirma Wsyopal.

 

 

 

notícias relacionadas:

Facebook Old Generated URLs Still Vulnerable to Open Redirect Attacks & A New Open Redirect Web Security Bugs

pentest


Facebook Old Generated URLs Still Vulnerable to Open Redirect Attacks & A New Open Redirect Web Security Bugs




Domain:
http://www.facebook.com



“Facebook is an online social networking service headquartered in Menlo Park, California. Its website was launched on February 4, 2004, by Mark Zuckerberg with his college roommates and fellow Harvard University students Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz and Chris Hughes. The founders had initially limited the website’s membership to Harvard students, but later expanded it to colleges in the Boston area, the Ivy League, and Stanford University. It gradually added support for students at various other universities and later to high-school students. Since 2006, anyone who is at least 13 years old is allowed to become a registered user of the website, though the age requirement may be higher depending on applicable local laws. Its name comes from a colloquialism for the directory given to it by American universities students.” (Wikipedia)



“Facebook had over 1.44 billion monthly active users as of March 2015.Because of the large volume of data users submit to the service, Facebook has come under scrutiny for their privacy policies. Facebook, Inc. held its initial public offering in February 2012 and began selling stock to the public three months later, reaching an original peak market capitalization of $104 billion. As of February 2015 Facebook reached a market capitalization of $212 Billion.” (Wikipedia)





Discover:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/

 



(1) General Vulnerabilities Description:

(1.1) Two Facebook vulnerabilities are introduced in this article.

Facebook has a computer cyber security bug problem. It can be exploited by Open Redirect attacks. This could allow a user to create a specially crafted URL, that if clicked, would redirect a victim from the intended legitimate web site to an arbitrary web site of the attacker’s choosing. Such attacks are useful as the crafted URL initially appear to be a web page of a trusted site. This could be leveraged to direct an unsuspecting user to a web page containing attacks that target client side software such as a web browser or document rendering programs.


Since Facebook is trusted by large numbers of other websites. Those vulnerabilities can be used to do “Covert Redirect” to other websites such as Amazon, eBay, Go-daddy, Yahoo, 163, Mail.ru etc.

 

(1.1.1)

One Facebook Open Redirect vulnerability was reported to Facebook. Facebook adopted a new mechanism to patch it. Though the reported URL redirection vulnerabilities are patched. However, all old generated URLs are still vulnerable to the attacks. Section (2) gives detail of it.

The reason may be related to Facebook’s third-party interaction system or database management system or both. Another reason may be related to Facebook’s design for different kind of browsers.

 

(1.1.2) Another new Open Redirect vulnerability related to Facebook is introduced, too. For reference, please read section (3).

The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on IE (9.0) of Windows 8, Firefox (24.0) & Google Chromium 30.0.1599.114 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (12.10),Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.



(1.2) Facebook’s URL Redirection System Related to “*.php” Files

All URLs’ redirection are based on several files, such l.php, a.php, landing.php and so on.

The main redirection are based on file “l.php” (Almost all redirection links are using it right now).

For file “l.php”, one parameter “h” is used for authentication. When it mentions to file “a.php”, parameter “eid” is used for authentication. All those two files use parameter “u” for the url redirected to. In some other files such as “landing.php”, parameters such as “url”, “next” are used.

<1>For parameter “h”, two forms of authentication are used.

<a>h=HAQHyinFq

<b>h=hAQHalW1CAQHrkVIQNNqgwhxRWLNsFVeH3auuImlbR1CgKA

<2>For parameter “eid”, one form of authentication is used.

<a>eid=AQLP8sRq6lbU0jz0lARx9A9uetB6FIF1N2-Yjj_ePj0d_ezubjstZeDo6qDsalKVJwy6uDb_hQ-9tBsA2dVoQRq0lniOu0os_gPe3gY5l8lYblhQSwBtdvgjXjNqaxLZMYoasr3vv46tFsh1fL7q4kjT2LFw52dnJWd4SE8qc0YuPWfgPeQywgM2wl0CoW-lftWkr2dX0dLcytyHjXnvhKfVS_pQBllszUzsPENxE6EuZ-53Lh188o56idnfyyk2L58pE7C94PF-za4ZVB0qbuA2EnPcSJI-7oIiIJmIhifHe0CYTzG512-Z_heN44VlyJHevhS9auAR8-lFCAIlYymnT_Qiwp92RxjNOfBypBvszQUrvB6PH3fANn1prfMBVm4RD_GFel14KVDS5USswbTOTkL3sZNhHUqqPHwBwU3JFePMMuwsfesigH85B_AxCsXUIWN7klKGSq8bPPsKSHttsa9hkkMpSfRKL7D_xwW4dU2xlmfGWil7jYRJmwfbOeF0zujk1FRBuM757tbfFMav-J-K9npbdrDrCuUVqV__Tf7CGZ89nPl-M2d09pE9enJj0OBXOaSXZX16LKaYnv1Wh4GKme7C-EOunITxyQtp1zy-48Uaz9mxO2x4bw7sBDfzDStF_Al8_0SMjWNTh-J38rBHAgT96X-dPFI43HU3x3fVymE9szrclBpvTaSfYezatgMzf77s3lQrQAMSlwSSRIzRuoFvQBmWKT0T5ZFgH5ykhYKhNMiKj577UO5g2Ojm-_-KKF4N_DBuG5R-I6EOSlhok2xUkpKVDnDcxZFTLxGmx5xc56J5kZLjJ96wnF2fH09Q19Qc2aU3xYFlEFrKjrlLpwGyOyCDx7_z7y1O4Efqew3Fa0Cb9s6Kk2jpLF5XEIaYzzXOLAffxXG6icBJVovb9RPmiZ5s9dKYYotLol68_X04O05bEvVccPEh-IQwX_VTMt3f23be2MECEqR2l1A1ZkJx4qP00GI1pZhU_CXAnjSaTNmtaINRUeSsLNEZZsPwpWJMfeeGSwuof9krC05eSWjO0jH9tua0KteMYhj8i-3dwSBp4f7nMcFwH5ltfCLhMCYNB8rxgzcAczyhLIo2UY-3FSaJXBZ0lvuZBvnj7myUnyc2lCcy-fWh93MRRaJrrinjtfr9fDSMHM9Cja5xi0eG3Vs0aClnWbeJZA79TvmYt7E53HfwGuv5-EJOqRh3cwZF-53uPHA73ikUk3xTApjQunJM4uIBhpy7iBIgn_OXXo3X03YUJtJcDuC20ocJbZ310VHliox5tYZF2oiMaOfgo9Y9KeqgsrJgwPCJeif4aB0Ne4g_oM_Tuqt2pXbdgoCawHIApF087eFKJqejp0jpEkJerXPyK-IqsD_SQfIm_2WJSkzwzATwQKs

 

 

 


(2) Vulnerability Description 1:

(2.1) A security researcher reported two Open Redirect vulnerabilities to Facebook in 2013. The following are the two links reported.

Though a new mechanism was adopted. However, all old generated redirections still work by parameter “h” and “eid”.

 

 

(2.2) A website was used for the following tests. The website is “http://www.tetraph.com/“. Suppose this website is malicious.

(2.2.1)

<1>First test

<a>file: “l.php”

<b>URL parameter: “u”

<c>authentication parameter: “h”

<d>form: “h=HAQHyinFq”.

<e>The authentication has no relation with all other parameters, such as “s”.

Examples:

URL 1:

Redirect Forbidden:

Redirect Works:

 

URL 2:

Redirect Forbidden:

Redirect Works:

 

 

(2.2.2)

<2>Second test. It is the same situation as above.

<a>file: “l.php”,

<b>url parameter “u”

<c>authentication parameter: “h”

<d>form: “h=hAQHalW1CAQHrkVIQNNqgwhxRWLNsFVeH3auuImlbR1CgKA”.

<e>The authentication has no relation to all other parameters, such as “env”, “s”.

 

Examples:

URL 1:

Redirect Forbidden:

 

URL 2:

Redirect Forbidden:

Redirect Works:

 

 

 

(3) Facebook File “a.php” Open Redirect Security Vulnerability

 

(3.1)

<a>file: “a.php”

<b>parameter “u”

<c> authentication parameter: “eid”

<d> form: “eid=5967147530925355409.6013336879369.AQKBG5nt468YgKeiSdgExZQRjwGb9r6EOu-Uc5WPvi-EVHEzadq8YSrgSvUzbMmxKPPfTgM-JrPff7tN38luc-8h16lxL0Gj_4qs1-58yWgXirMH4AEf8sOEsZc5DTx7yFndgODvD5NrC-314BIj4pZvMhlljXv89lHRH6pBgyGGVm-oWBDIF8CuRER1f5ZGbKdsiUcBISdWTninVzvBdW1mZY0SWzqT21fZmhgVKtdkRf5l_pag7hAmotFK9HI5XHfGicWVqzRyTNiDIYjyVjTv4km2FOEp7WP3w65aVUKP_w”.

<e>The authentication has no relation to all other parameters, such as “mac”, “_tn_”.

Examples:

Vulnerable URL:

https://www.facebook.com/a.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Ffb-nym.adnxs.com%2Ffclick%3Fclickenc%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fbs.serving-sys.com%252FBurstingPipe%252FadServer.bs%253Fcn%253Dtf%2526c%253D20%2526mc%253Dclick%2526pli%253D8782431%2526PluID%253D0%2526ord%253D%257BCACHEBUSTER%257D%26cp%3D%253Fdi%253DzGxX6INl-T9QvRSibN_3P5qZmZmZmfk_UL0Uomzf9z_ObFfog2X5P_WPPCuD-to_CKEeLew3cQIQkc9SAAAAAHQcDQB2BQAAKAcAAAIAAAD4iq8AanMCAAAAAQBVU0QAVVNEAGMASABq4DoFka4BAgUCAQUAAIgAkinLswAAAAA.%252Fcnd%253D%252521qQYdPgjeqqYBEPiVvgUY6uYJIAA.%252Freferrer%253Dfacebook.com%252F&mac=AQJllyaGzLYoRoQz&__tn__=%2AB&eid=5967147530925355409.6013336879369.AQKBG5nt468YgKeiSdgExZQRjwGb9r6EOu-Uc5WPvi-EVHEzadq8YSrgSvUzbMmxKPPfTgM-JrPff7tN38luc-8h16lxL0Gj_4qs1-58yWgXirMH4AEf8sOEsZc5DTx7yFndgODvD5NrC-314BIj4pZvMhlljXv89lHRH6pBgyGGVm-oWBDIF8CuRER1f5ZGbKdsiUcBISdWTninVzvBdW1mZY0SWzqT21fZmhgVKtdkRf5l_pag7hAmotFK9HI5XHfGicWVqzRyTNiDIYjyVjTv4km2FOEp7WP3w65aVUKP_w

POC:

 

(3.2) Facebook Login Page Covert Redirect Security Vulnerability

Vulnerable URL Related to Login.php Based on a.php:

https://www.facebook.com/login.php?next=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fa.php%3Fu%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.rp.edu.sg%252Fopenhouse2014%252F%253Futm_source%253Dfacebook%2526utm_medium%253Dcpc%2526utm_campaign%253Dopenhouse2014%26mac%3DAQKyRHClixA20iGL%26__tn__%3D%252AB%26eid%3DAQLAHC7szSXhT3FaEBXe5YFsOC0kEM4nN9PlVovdilvuzROStFXoYqptlKpcJAzHNTLpxWAIrmJYsR6RVG_Htk6pgT7Iol6lWHDJvn7Cg5sqigvE_eVS895Eh6fSwxH3fgfWcNDrEl5_lFgRbrJtC71R68rW_VXS9QCN7Po9wTWDnbyZTaXawdrdQyibryvA56Spr5GcUDUboRFxy8YSr2ahUV_goDAQA3OKmCACEn8CmyMrOT5gZq3iwusysdchRxLIv5N82-GMTiDxXXgkDYf1P7XwvklWpfy_cEItZzV5v0P7fRZB3qiq_RDx9jhEzndlJhUJL2aWE0ldPmGKGz9xWyvPaPLOwzBo23GQbpj2ZN_tw9B9tz2l3tGIN1yegd_Wf6PSFIZOuBXfZILvmILcxg3qz4dHx1fmgPZBpf_34mPnMEkgZqbT2WeV_GZKz8RDIg88D3vrmwyMwWxeh3xyGuddjZUjOUjPCUwrgSrWZK3XHRA7TA7tWIsQ4X1bsjx9c72mm8bZmmRBRJwqOcjsW0QEVETs_Cs9pS9QBkgX8yVPJCHuk1v_xkj4EHHH9sNP7a4GRs8olklBTKhCcJ908sVrQVT2I-cQYw2SVU9hWaWWjX2AGt3WpdT2kx6SIPoPQpX5cIC4Lcfaa7EcZFBnoQPv3mR5BNHRFTh_6Qvr01BrCG3Fv5VeDeXhM8cHk6VuBtj5smz0ZeGT5JWvub5ORJ4xzVN0zAW8V4qiKiVFKTEFMZASaZFon41VFCbhxkX0Bi62Ko64PY6uP64tCMWh6yX2o0JMc0mJWFJRp1695OCKgLXf0udRyWDESTyYgJXIlxecCmlwCEbleAsE-wtDXNOfDTXOzApr1sZO_58FBRaw-K4Z2VRXLir5mrdXTKnM1Y4rDDqGZur9G7LfuXrCr5oR1J5LJ8sVupHqsiN7-UqdakiEEIBq750KxVjaAdCyqJp_5EJ-yVMK3f2pMX7cQ2Lw6u434hHimuLN9VDPLkpSiMlPOa8RkarDSred73IfQiv-PluegYDfunZFxj1KvcAlzhVZsL-a52hJmXrOrzKuV0hyZaBLtAIo6AEoXXV30D-6iraSUphkOFzYt3ah6oRrmXLQZKm2E8Cuag5d_rAnwvIr98dn4OSa8Z4MCZemI3uH8cjxr86aE046uTA_Hm1GjYM5l7wkpHknHI8QR2q5Cioo2h6WiUO-jsIFkQ4XFgAd5IUCcAbQukXdC4GJzl18iaN8wkylsTk8aVBn6G1xZadSL0b5R3NgsYfQUVtV0g9slnOLNkgq0NLMAk0kWFs

POC:

https://www.facebook.com/login.php?next=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fa.php%3Fu%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.stackoverflow.com%26mac%3DAQKyRHClixA20iGL%26__tn__%3D%252AB%26eid%3DAQLAHC7szSXhT3FaEBXe5YFsOC0kEM4nN9PlVovdilvuzROStFXoYqptlKpcJAzHNTLpxWAIrmJYsR6RVG_Htk6pgT7Iol6lWHDJvn7Cg5sqigvE_eVS895Eh6fSwxH3fgfWcNDrEl5_lFgRbrJtC71R68rW_VXS9QCN7Po9wTWDnbyZTaXawdrdQyibryvA56Spr5GcUDUboRFxy8YSr2ahUV_goDAQA3OKmCACEn8CmyMrOT5gZq3iwusysdchRxLIv5N82-GMTiDxXXgkDYf1P7XwvklWpfy_cEItZzV5v0P7fRZB3qiq_RDx9jhEzndlJhUJL2aWE0ldPmGKGz9xWyvPaPLOwzBo23GQbpj2ZN_tw9B9tz2l3tGIN1yegd_Wf6PSFIZOuBXfZILvmILcxg3qz4dHx1fmgPZBpf_34mPnMEkgZqbT2WeV_GZKz8RDIg88D3vrmwyMwWxeh3xyGuddjZUjOUjPCUwrgSrWZK3XHRA7TA7tWIsQ4X1bsjx9c72mm8bZmmRBRJwqOcjsW0QEVETs_Cs9pS9QBkgX8yVPJCHuk1v_xkj4EHHH9sNP7a4GRs8olklBTKhCcJ908sVrQVT2I-cQYw2SVU9hWaWWjX2AGt3WpdT2kx6SIPoPQpX5cIC4Lcfaa7EcZFBnoQPv3mR5BNHRFTh_6Qvr01BrCG3Fv5VeDeXhM8cHk6VuBtj5smz0ZeGT5JWvub5ORJ4xzVN0zAW8V4qiKiVFKTEFMZASaZFon41VFCbhxkX0Bi62Ko64PY6uP64tCMWh6yX2o0JMc0mJWFJRp1695OCKgLXf0udRyWDESTyYgJXIlxecCmlwCEbleAsE-wtDXNOfDTXOzApr1sZO_58FBRaw-K4Z2VRXLir5mrdXTKnM1Y4rDDqGZur9G7LfuXrCr5oR1J5LJ8sVupHqsiN7-UqdakiEEIBq750KxVjaAdCyqJp_5EJ-yVMK3f2pMX7cQ2Lw6u434hHimuLN9VDPLkpSiMlPOa8RkarDSred73IfQiv-PluegYDfunZFxj1KvcAlzhVZsL-a52hJmXrOrzKuV0hyZaBLtAIo6AEoXXV30D-6iraSUphkOFzYt3ah6oRrmXLQZKm2E8Cuag5d_rAnwvIr98dn4OSa8Z4MCZemI3uH8cjxr86aE046uTA_Hm1GjYM5l7wkpHknHI8QR2q5Cioo2h6WiUO-jsIFkQ4XFgAd5IUCcAbQukXdC4GJzl18iaN8wkylsTk8aVBn6G1xZadSL0b5R3NgsYfQUVtV0g9slnOLNkgq0NLMAk0kWFs





Those vulnerabilities were reported to Facebook in 2014 and they have been patched.





Several other similar products 0-day vulnerabilities have been found by some other bug hunter researchers before. Facebook has patched some of them. “The Full Disclosure mailing list is a public forum for detailed discussion of vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques, as well as tools, papers, news, and events of interest to the community. FD differs from other security lists in its open nature and support for researchers’ right to decide how to disclose their own discovered bugs. The full disclosure movement has been credited with forcing vendors to better secure their products and to publicly acknowledge and fix flaws rather than hide them. Vendor legal intimidation and censorship attempts are not tolerated here!” All the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. Large number of Facebook bugs were published here. FD also publishes suggestions, advisories, solutions details related to Open Redirect vulnerabilities and cyber intelligence recommendations.








(4) Amazon Covert Redirect Security Vulnerability Based on Facebook

Since Facebook is trusted by large numbers of other websites. Those vulnerabilities can be used to do “Covert Redirect” to other websites such as Amazon.


Domain:
http://www.amazon.com


“American electronic commerce company with headquarters in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest Internet-based retailer in the United States. Amazon.com started as an online bookstore, but soon diversified, selling DVDs, Blu-rays, CDs, video downloads/streaming, MP3 downloads/streaming, software, video games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys and jewelry. The company also produces consumer electronics—notably, Amazon Kindle e-book readers, Fire tablets, Fire TV and Fire Phone — and is a major provider of cloud computing services. Amazon also sells certain low-end products like USB cables under its inhouse brand AmazonBasics. Amazon has separate retail websites for United States, United Kingdom & Ireland, France, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Australia, Brazil, Japan, China, India and Mexico. Amazon also offers international shipping to certain other countries for some of its products. In 2011, it had professed an intention to launch its websites in Poland and Sweden.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

The vulnerability exists at “redirect.html?” page with “&location” parameter, e.g.

 

(4.1) When a user is redirected from Amazon to another site, Amazon will check parameters “&token”. If the redirected URL’s domain is OK, Amazon will allow the reidrection.

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Amazon to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Amazon directly.

One of the vulnerable domain is,
http://www.facebook.com

 

(4.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope“. Suppose it is malicious.

Vulnerable URL:

POC:

 

 

 

 

 

Related Articles:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2015/Jan/22
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1428
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2015/01/12/1
http://marc.info/?l=full-disclosure&m=142104333521454&w=4
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/facebook-open-redirect/
https://www.facebook.com/essaybeans/posts/570476126427191
http://germancast.blogspot.de/2015/06/facebook-web-security-0day-bug.html
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2015/01/11/facebook-open-redirect/
http://essaybeans.lofter.com/post/1cc77d20_7300027
http://qianqiuxue.tumblr.com/post/120750458855/itinfotech-facebook-web-security-0day-bug
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=472994806188548&id=405943696226993
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2015/01/11/facebook-open-redirect/
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/phishing/facebook-open-redirect/
http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/post/120750347586/facebook-web-security-0day-bug
http://ittechnology.lofter.com/post/1cfbf60d_72fd108
http://russiapost.blogspot.ru/2015/06/facebook-web-security-0day-bug.html
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/606676645265567744
https://plus.google.com/u/0/110001022997295385049/posts/hb6seddG561
http://whitehatpost.blog.163.com/blog/static/24223205420155501020837/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-security/facebook-open-redirect/







Google DoubleClicK System Bugs Could Be Used by Spammers

887

 

Google DoubleClick.net (Advertising) System URL Redirection Vulnerabilities Could Be Used by Spammers

 

Although Google does not include Open Redirect vulnerabilities in its bug bounty program, its preventive measures against Open Redirect attacks have been quite thorough and effective to date.

 

However, Google might have overlooked the security of its DoubleClick.net ​advertising system. After some test, it is found that most of the redirection URLs within DoubleClick.net are vulnerable to Open Redirect vulnerabilities. Many redirection are likely to be affected. This could allow a user to create a specially crafted URL, that if clicked, would redirect a victim from the intended legitimate web site to an arbitrary web site of the attacker’s choosing. Such attacks are useful as the crafted URL initially appear to be a web page of a trusted site. This could be leveraged to direct an unsuspecting user to a web page containing attacks that target client side software such as a web browser or document rendering programs.

 

These redirections can be easily used by spammers, too.

 

Some URLs belong to Googleads.g.Doubleclick.net are vulnerable to Open Redirect attacks, too. While Google prevents similar URL redirections other than Googleads.g.Doubleclick.net. Attackers can use URLs related to Google Account to make the attacks more powerful.

 

Moreover, these vulnerabilities can be used to attack other companies such as Google, eBay, The New York Times, Amazon, Godaddy, Yahoo, Netease, e.g. by bypassing their Open Redirect filters (Covert Redirect). These cyber security security bug problems have not been patched. Other similar web and computer attacks will be published in the near future.

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/

 

 

 

(1) Background Related to Google DoubleClick.net.

(1.1) What is DoubleClick.net?

DoubleClick is a subsidiary of Google which develops and provides Internet ad serving services. Its clients include agencies, marketers (Universal McCann, AKQA etc.) and publishers who serve customers like Microsoft, General Motors, Coca-Cola, Motorola, L’Oréal, Palm, Inc., Apple Inc., Visa USA, Nike, Carlsberg among others. DoubleClick’s headquarters is in New York City, United States.

 

DoubleClick was founded in 1996 by Kevin O’Connor and Dwight Merriman. It was formerly listed as “DCLK” on the NASDAQ, and was purchased by private equity firms Hellman & Friedman and JMI Equity in July 2005. In March 2008, Google acquired DoubleClick for US$3.1 billion. Unlike many other dot-com companies, it survived the dot-com bubble and focuses on uploading ads and reporting their performance.” (Wikipedia)

 

(1.2) Reports Related to Google DoubleClick.net Used by Spammers

(1.2.1)

Google DoublClick.net has been used by spammers for long time. The following is a report in 2008.

 

“The open redirect had become popular with spammers trying to lure users into clicking their links, as they could be made to look like safe URLs within Google’s domain.”
https://www.virusbtn.com/blog/2008/06_03a.xml?comments

 

(1.2.2)

Mitechmate published a blog related to DoubleClick.net spams in 2014.

 

Ad.doubleclick.net is recognized as a perilous adware application that causes unwanted redirections when surfing on the certain webpages. Actually it is another browser hijacker that aims to distribute frauds to make money.Commonly people pick up Ad.doubleclick virus when download softwares, browse porn site or read spam email attachments. It enters into computer sneakily after using computer insecurely.Ad.doubleclick.net is not just annoying, this malware traces users’ personal information, which would be utilized for cyber criminal.”
http://blog.mitechmate.com/remove-ad-doubleclick-net-redirect-virus/

 

(1.2.3)

Malwarebytes posted a news related to DoubleClick.net malvertising in 2014.

 

 

(2) DoubleClick.net System URL Redirection Vulnerabilities Details.

The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

 

Used webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://securitypost.tumblr.com/“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

 

(2.1) Vulnerable URLs Related to Googleads.g.Doubleclick.net.

(2.1.1)

Some URLs belong to googleads.g.doubleclick.net are vulnerable to Open Redirect attacks. While Google prevents similar URL redirection other than googleads.g.doubleclick.net.

 

Vulnerable URLs:

 

POC:

 

Attackers can make use of the following URLs to make the attacks more powerful, i.e.

 

POC:

 

 

(2.1.2)

While Google prevents similar URL redirection other than googleads.g.doubleclick.net , e.g.

 

 

 

(2.2) Vulnerable URLs Related to DoubleClick.net.

Vulnerable URLs 1:

 

POC:

 

Vulnerable URLs 2:

 

POC:

 

Vulnerable URLs 3:

 

POC:

 

 

We can see that Google DoubleClick.net has Open Redirect vulnerabilities and could be misused by spammers.

 

 

 

(2.3)

 

Several other similar products 0-day vulnerabilities have been found by some other bug hunter researchers before. Google has patched some of them. BugTraq is a full disclosure moderated mailing list for the *detailed* discussion and announcement of computer security vulnerabilities: what they are, how to exploit them, and how to fix them. The below things be posted to the Bugtraq list: (a) Information on computer or network related security vulnerabilities (UNIX, Windows NT, or any other). (b) Exploit programs, scripts or detailed processes about the above. (c) Patches, workarounds, fixes. (d) Announcements, advisories or warnings. (e) Ideas, future plans or current works dealing with computer/network security. (f) Information material regarding vendor contacts and procedures. (g) Individual experiences in dealing with above vendors or security organizations. (h) Incident advisories or informational reporting. (i) New or updated security tools. A large number of the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. It also publishes suggestions, advisories, solutions details related to Open Redirect vulnerabilities and cyber intelligence recommendations.

 

 

 

(3) Google DoubleClick.net Can Adversely Affect Other Websites.

At the same time, Google DoubleClick.net can be used to do “Covert Redirect” to other websites, such as Google, eBay, The New York Times, etc.(Bypass other websites’ Open Redirect filters)

 

 

(3.1) Google Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

Domain:
google.com

 

“Google is an American multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software. Most of its profits are derived from AdWords, an online advertising service that places advertising near the list of search results. Google was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin while they were Ph.D. students at Stanford University. Together they own about 14 percent of its shares but control 56 percent of the stockholder voting power through supervoting stock. They incorporated Google as a privately held company on September 4, 1998. An initial public offering followed on August 19, 2004. Its mission statement from the outset was “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful,” and its unofficial slogan was “Don’t be evil”. In 2004, Google moved to its new headquarters in Mountain View, California, nicknamed the Googleplex. The corporation has been estimated to run more than one million servers in data centers around the world (as of 2007). It processes over one billion search requests and about 24 petabytes of user-generated data each day (as of 2009). In December 2013, Alexa listed google.com as the most visited website in the world. Numerous Google sites in other languages figure in the top one hundred, as do several other Google-owned sites such as YouTube and Blogger. Its market dominance has led to prominent media coverage, including criticism of the company over issues such as search neutrality, copyright, censorship, and privacy.” (Wikipedia)

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

More Details:

 

 

(3.2) eBay Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

Domain:
ebay.com

 

“eBay Inc. (stylized as ebay) is an American multinational corporation and e-commerce company, providing consumer to consumer & business to consumer sales services via Internet. It is headquartered in San Jose, California, United States. eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar in 1995, and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, it is a multi-billion dollar business with operations localized in over thirty countries. The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a broad variety of goods and services worldwide. In addition to its auction-style sales, the website has since expanded to include “Buy It Now” shopping; shopping by UPC, ISBN, or other kind of SKU (via Half.com); online classified advertisements (via Kijiji or eBay Classifieds); online event ticket trading (via StubHub); online money transfers (via PayPal) and other services. It is not a free website, but charges users an invoice fee when sellers have sold or listed any items.” (Wikipedia)

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

More Details:

 

 

(3.3) The New York Times (Nytimes.com) Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Google Doubleclick.net

Domain:
nytimes.com

 

“The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company. It has won 114 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. The paper’s print version has the largest circulation of any metropolitan newspaper in the United States, and the second-largest circulation overall, behind The Wall Street Journal. It is ranked 39th in the world by circulation. Following industry trends, its weekday circulation has fallen to fewer than one million daily since 1990. Nicknamed for years as “The Gray Lady”, The New York Times is long regarded within the industry as a national “newspaper of record”. It is owned by The New York Times Company. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., (whose family (Ochs-Sulzberger) has controlled the paper for five generations, since 1896), is both the paper’s publisher and the company’s chairman. Its international version, formerly the International Herald Tribune, is now called the International New York Times.” (Wikipedia)

 

Vulnerable URL:

 

POC:

 

More Details:

 

These vulnerabilities were reported to Google earlier in 2014. But it seems that Google has yet taken any actions. All of the vulnerabilities are still not patched.

 

 

 

 

Related Posts:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/28
https://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2014110106
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1192
https://www.mail-archive.com/fulldisclosure%40seclists.org/msg01307.html
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/11/google-doubleclicknetadvertising-system.html=
http://www.techenet.com/2014/12/doubleclick-do-google-pode-ser-vulneravel-a-ataques/
https://computertechhut.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/google-doubleclick-spam/
http://mathpost.tumblr.com/post/120760828940/tetraph-google-doubleclick-net-advertising
http://tetraph.com/security/open-redirect/google-doubleclick-netadvertising-system
https://www.facebook.com/essayjeans/posts/838922772865543
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+essayjeans/posts/Y12x6gXfyFX
http://mathstopic.blogspot.com/2015/06/google-doubleclick-spam.html
http://itsecurity.lofter.com/post/1cfbf9e7_72fe79f
https://twitter.com/essayjeans/status/606726247578636288
http://tetraph.tumblr.com/post/120760676767/google-doubleclick-net-advertising-system-url
https://itinfotechnology.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/google-doubleclick-spam/
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=945171075538075
http://guyuzui.lofter.com/post/1ccdcda4_7305f25
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/23460305120155534216326/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/spamming/google-doubleclick-spam/

 

 

Security-Bug: Facebook- und Google-Login unsicher, Covert Redirect

Security-Bug: Facebook- und Google-Login unsicher, Covert Redirect

Der nächste Hammer nach dem OpenSSL-Bug: Die sehr weit verbreiteten Login-Protokolle OpenID und OAuth 2.0 haben eine Sicherheitslücke, über die Angreifer an vertrauliche Daten der Nutzer gelangen können. Dies fand Wang Jing, ein Student der Nanyang Technological University in Singapur, heraus. Betroffen sind diverse große Webdienste, die auf diese Protokolle setzen, zum Beispiel Google, Facebook, Microsoft und PayPal.

WebSecurity

Sicherheitsrisiko: Login via Facebook oder Google sind angreifbar

OpenID und OAuth, wie OpenSSL Open-Source-Anwendungen, dienen als Login-Methode für Webdienste und Apps. User können sich darüber mit einem bestehenden Konto (etwa von Facebook oder Google) bei dem Dienst registrieren, ohne dort ein eigenes Benutzerkonto anlegen zu müssen. Ähnlich funktioniert auch die Anmeldung bei Facebook-Apps. In beiden Fällen hat der User den Vorteil, dass seine Anmeldedaten bei Google oder Facebook bleiben, der neue Dienst also weder E-Mail-Adresse noch Passwort erhält.

http://xingzhehong.lofter.com/post/1cfd0db2_55b5016

兩款互聯網登錄系統曝出重大漏洞 黑客可用知名網站釣魚 – Covert Redirect

phishing

 

繼OpenSSL漏洞後,開源安全軟件再曝安全漏洞。新加坡南洋理工大學研究人員,物理和數學科學學院博士生王晶 (Wang Jing) 發現,OAuth 2.0, OpenID 授權接口的網站存隱蔽重定向漏洞、英文名為“Covert Redirect”。

 

攻擊者創建壹個使用真實站點地址的彈出式登錄窗口——而不是使用壹個假的域名——以引誘上網者輸入他們的個人信息。

 

黑客可利用該漏洞給釣魚網站“變裝”,用知名大型網站鏈接引誘用護登錄釣魚網站,壹旦用護訪問釣魚網站並成功登六授權,黑客即可讀取其在網站上存儲的私密信息。

 

騰訊,阿裏巴巴,QQ、新浪微博、淘寶網,支付寶,網易,PayPal, eBay, Amazon, Facebook、Google, LinkedIn, Yahoo, VK.com, Microsoft, Mail.ru, Github, WordPress 等國內外大量知名網站受影響。

 

鑒於OAuth和OpenID被廣泛用於各大公司——如微軟、Facebook、Google、以及 LinkedIn——Wang表示他已經向這些公司已經了匯報。Wang聲稱,微軟已經給出了答復,調查並證實該問題出在第三方系統,而不是該公司的自 有 站點。Facebook也表示,“短期內仍無法完成完成這兩個問題的修復工作,只得迫使每個應用程序平臺采用白名單”。至於Google,預計該公司 會追 蹤OpenID的問題;而LinkedIn則聲稱它將很快在博客中說明這壹問題。

 

OAuth 是壹個被廣泛應用的開放登六協議,允許用護讓第三方應用訪問該用護在某壹網站上存儲的私密的信息(如照片,視頻,聯系人列表),而無需將用護名和密碼提供給第三方應用。這次曝出的漏洞,可將Oauth2.0的使用方(第三方網站)的回跳域名劫持到惡意網站去,黑客利用XSS漏洞攻擊就能隨意操作被授權的帳號,讀取用護的隱私信息。像騰訊、新浪微博等社交網站壹般對登六回調地址沒有任何限制,極易遭黑客利用。

 

 

 

相關資料,
http://www.cnet.com/news/serious-security-flaw-in-oauth-and-openid-discovered/
http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/after-heartbleed-major-covert-redirect-flaw-threatens-oauth-openid-and-the-internet-222945.html
http://tetraph.com/covert_redirect/oauth2_openid_covert_redirect.html
http://techxplore.com/news/2014-05-math-student-oauth-openid-vulnerability.html
http://phys.org/news/2014-05-math-student-oauth-openid-vulnerability.html
http://www.tomsguide.com/us/facebook-google-covert-redirect-flaw,news-18726.html
http://news.yahoo.com/facebook-google-users-threatened-security-192547549.html
http://thehackernews.com/2014/05/nasty-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html
http://www.scmagazine.com/covert-redirect-vulnerability-impacts-oauth-20-openid/article/345407/
http://blog.kaspersky.com/facebook-openid-oauth-vulnerable/
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2014/05/05/facebook-google-users-threatened-by-new-security-flaw/
http://network.pconline.com.cn/471/4713896.html
http://media.sohu.com/20140504/n399096249.shtml/
http://it.people.com.cn/n/2014/0504/c1009-24969253.html
http://www.cnbeta.com/articles/288503.htm
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-security/oauth-2-0-and-openid-covert-redirect/
http://baike.baidu.com/link?url=0v9QZaGB09ePxHb70bzgWqlW-C9jieVguuDObtvJ_6WFY3h2vWnnjNDy4-jliDmqbT47SmdGS1_pZ4BbGN4Re_
http://itinfotech.tumblr.com/post/118850342491/covert-redirect
http://tetraph.com/covert_redirect/
http://ittechnology.lofter.com/post/1cfbf60d_6f09f58
https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%9A%B1%E8%94%BD%E9%87%8D%E5%AE%9A%E5%90%91%E6%BC%8F%E6%B4%9E
http://www.baike.com/wiki/%E9%9A%90%E8%94%BD%E9%87%8D%E5%AE%9A%E5%90%91%E6%BC%8F%E6%B4%9E
http://www.csdn.net/article/2014-05-04/2819588